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Topic: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures  (Read 433 times)

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Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« on: April 26, 2020, 08:44:47 PM »
Hi there! As the title says, I was hoping someone could help me with my research into how to use bentonite clay on a laceration, particularly on the lower leg/shin area. My confusion primarily stems from whether it would be best to apply clay along the entirety of the wound, which goes to the bone, through part of the muscle, and is roughly U shaped-- well really more accurately shaped like this ), but horizontally--   as opposed to just the "seam" of the wound, where the visible sutures are.

I did see Jason's post about wanting to use the clay as soon as possible, which I took to essentially mean not wanting to "push" the infection away. It is a little late for that, as it is just over a week old. There appears to be mild infection, in the form of a small amount of pus, coming from the seam. Antibiotics taken orally.

Any information that may be useful to my research on this is greatly appreciated. Thank you!


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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2020, 09:47:52 PM »
Hi Avalon:

...the problem with using clay over sutures is that the clay can cause the body to literally expel them, especially if there is an infection beneath.

I've even used clay to pull out staples (hundreds of them) from large skin graft donor sites.

There's no way to tell how long it would be to leave a clay pack on so as to NOT cause a potential problem with sutures... 10 minutes?  15 minutes?

Every so often someone sends me a picture of deep gashes opening back up where the stitches were rejected and expelled by the body prematurely.  These people either get the sutures done again, or simply let the clay heal the wound without stitches.

Will this ALWAYS happen?  No, I don't believe so.  Still, I have no way of knowing when it will or when it won't happen.

Even when sutures are not used, if a wound starts to heal, but then gets infected (when clay was NOT used, when it IS used, no infection will likely occur), clay will rapidly completely debride the wound, pretty much taking you back to the first stage of healing (but with a clean, infection free wound).

If an infection gets bad, though, I personally wouldn't hesitate to utilize clay.
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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2020, 10:06:11 PM »
Thank you for sharing that insight with me. While it seems obvious that such a result might occur now, I hadn't thought of that at all and would likely have been concerned were such a thing to happen, despite having tremendous success in all other instances of use.

After  considering the situation, I've decided I'm going to go ahead and apply some for five to ten minutes, and see where that leaves me -- as I've had the sutures for two weeks and am more concerned about what else might be brewing.

I felt I should clarify that I am usually staunchly opposed to most instances of antibiotics; frankly, the only reason I caved and started taking them was because the people around me were concerned that I wasn't -- but now I'm fairly confident that I was in a much better place prior to whole utilizing "alternative" protocols.

But oh well \_(ツ)_/ I am sure I have use for another lesson of learning to trust my intuition  ;) 

Thank you again; I'm thrilled to have found your site(s) and look forward to utilizing them frequently ^-^


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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2020, 11:48:35 PM »
Had a deep cut onto my calf muscles many years ago. Was needing stitches, really. I put clay (no stitches) and some pus came up, which I expected and then healed amazingly well, with hardly any visible scar.
If there had been stitches, pus might also have come out and I presume if the stitches were expelled, it would not matter, as the clay would close the wound?


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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2020, 09:27:35 AM »
In essence yes.

What first would have happened is that all of the dead tissue and infection would have been pulled out.

Then, the wound would have healed from the inside out.

I did a concept study that showed that hydrated clay could be kept in a wound 24/7 during the healing period, and the wound would heal perfectly fine with very little discomfort/pain.

In such a situation, though, you would have to make sure that the clay did not dry out.
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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2020, 11:48:29 PM »
not quite related as you are talking of a wound and not sure where to put that post.
Read that a poultice should not be left more than 2-3 hours as then it might do more harm than good...


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Re: Using Clay on Deep Laceration and Sutures
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2020, 09:27:16 AM »
This really applies only to treating areas when:

1.  A person is new to clay.  The body does need time to adjust to use.

2.  When using poultices over the areas above or around major organs.  It can cause exhaustion, sometimes, or rare occasions, even shock.

3.  When clay use is causing more extreme detox reactions.  This usually only applies to when clay is used over sensitive areas, and in larger volumes, but this isn't always the case.  Don't worry, though, the body will let you know!

There certainly are lots of "rules" to follow with clay use, as it is often much more powerful than one would imagine at first... But, there are just as many reasons and situations where it can be wise to "break the rules".  It's one of those things where it helps to really know the rules well so that you can know when to break them! :)

Luckily, a person can usually do very well by listening carefully to how the body responds, and acting accordingly!  If the body needs a break, it is certainly wise to give it one!

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Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Exploration:  Meditation Program