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Topic: Grit in clay  (Read 4290 times)

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Grit in clay
« on: February 06, 2021, 03:13:12 PM »
Hi Jason,
I currently drink a mix of zeolite and Argiletz finely ground green illite clay in the morning. I hydrate it 24 hours before drinking (2 teaspoonfuls). I shake it and let it rest for a few minutes and then drink the water. However I still find it rather gritty. Is it the Argiletz clay? I know it might not be the best for drinking purposes but I can't seem to find any of the ones that swell up here in Europe. Argiletz is the main brand. Any advice?
Thanks!
Rebecca


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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2021, 04:06:19 PM »
Hi Rebecca:

That is probably the Argiletz.  Ordering clay termed "finely ground" with clay is like ordering chunks of rocks (lol)... this is why we only carry what used to be state certified "food grade" Argiletz, which is the ultra-ventilated.

But, it could also be the zeolite, if it is not micronized.  Zeolite has many more uses at a technical grade mesh than when used as micronized.

Either way, the "grit" is inconvenient, but nothing to really be concerned about.

You could "water wash" the clay.  Hydrate it the night before.  The next day, decant (or pour into another glass careful to leave the sediment in the old container).  Then, mix very well again.  Allow the clay to set for about 30 to 45 minutes.  Decant again, this time more carefully.

You can take the top 50% of the liquid, and leave the rest.

When I make clay this way, I usually use a very large culinary syringe to "pull out" the ideal clay water I want to use.  I actually LEAVE a small portion of the "top" layer as well; anything lighter than the water will stay to the top, anything lighter than the water, that isn't held in suspension via brownian motion (etc) will settle out to the bottom.
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Jason R. Eaton
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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2021, 05:27:46 AM »
Thanks a lot! I usually shake it and let it sit for a few minutes but probably not long enough, only 10 minutes or so,  so I'll try 30 mins tomorrow. The water on top does not contain much clay at all, it's only slightly cloudy. And next time I'll buy the hyper ventilated, good to know!

btw, is it ok to create a dry mix of zeolite, clay, diatomaceous earth and charcoal, keep in a jar and hydrate the whole mixture together for 24hours?

Kind regards,

Rebecca


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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2021, 05:35:07 AM »
PS just checked Argiletz's offering of ultra ventilated clays and they have white clay (kaoline), red clay, green clay, yellow clay, ghassoul...Which would be the best for internal use? Is Illite ok to drink?...I seem to remember reading that it doesn't swell up like other clays in one of your articles.
Kind regards,
Rebecca


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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2021, 10:58:47 AM »
Hi Rebecca:

We carry and use ultra-ventilated French green illite from Argiletz as a high quality edible clay.

Again, it depends upon the zeolite.  Standard quarry grade zeolite will not stay in water at all.  Zeolite, as far as all of the colloids we use, is the one that rejects water the most.  It is, in essence, rock.  But yes, all of these colloids are pretty much co-compatible, as they all carry the same electrical charge, and they are all (at least on this particular "list"), either pH nuetral or alkaline.

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Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
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Current Project:
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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2021, 05:07:20 AM »
thank you! :)


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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2021, 04:38:36 AM »
Dear Jason,

Will zeolite, diatomaceous, or charcoal sink to the bottom together with the grit if I shake my mixture and let it sit for a while? I wonder whether I'm throwing a lot of the good stuff away along with the grit from the clay by hydrating, mixing and letting all four binders sit all together in one jar.

Have a nice weekend!

Rebecca


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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2021, 09:54:27 AM »
Hi Rebecca:

Yes, it is possible.  There will be a saturation point that is hard to "predict" with colloids.

I think a good practice is to "remix" the colloid vigorously, and then let it sit for about 2-3 minutes... or however is long enough to allow the grit to settle without allowing time for the "good stuff" to fall out of suspension.

All of this also depends upon the mesh or particle size of all of the particles as well.
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Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
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Re: Grit in clay
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2021, 06:29:55 AM »
Understood, thank you! :)
Rebecca