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Topic: Is the Lead in Therapeutic Clay Dangerous?  (Read 505 times)

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Is the Lead in Therapeutic Clay Dangerous?
« on: February 23, 2019, 04:24:05 PM »
(frequently asked question via email)

Please review this beginner's guide carefully, it contains a wealth of good information not found elsewhere:

http://www.eytonsearth.org/earthcures/a-comprehensive-beginners-guide-to-using-edible-clay/

This document is composed of all of the questions I have been asked about edible clay over the years.  It answers these types of questions and probably many you haven't yet thought to ask!

Short answer:  The lead is complexed in the bentonite crystalline structure, fused to the crystal's surface at the time of the volcanic eruption by an immense amount of heat, followed by rapid cooling.  This is true with volcanic-origin clays, and mostly true for sedimentary clays as well, although with sedimentary clay it is possible that some lead in the clay would be from exposure to the local environment (like sea clays picking up tiny amounts of mercury from the sea water).

Not only are most smectite particles too large to get absorbed into the body, even if this did occur, the lead is inert. It is simply eliminated along with the clay particles.

Also, keep in mind that clay is used to help eliminate heavy metals.  If any of the lead were nascent, clay particles would most like sorpt most it, preventing the lead from becoming bio-available.

I personally do heavy metal challenge testing because I still have amalgams in-mouth.  My lead and aluminum levels are always very low.  One could say that my regular exposure to clay, both internally and externally, is quite excessive.

All the evidence that I've seen to date indicates that the trace amounts of heavy metals found in traditional-use edible clay pose no risk.

That said, to date there have been no "official" definitive tests on humans via actual medical trials.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 09:35:05 PM by Jason »
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Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u