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Topic: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics  (Read 1094 times)

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(via email correspondence):

Smectite clay particles, since they are wafer thin, can help to actually heal tissue.  A clay particle will adhere to damaged tissue, protect it, and stimulate healing.  Healing tissue usually has a net positive charge.  Incidentally, scar tissue has a net negative charge.  Scar tissue actually slightly repels clay particles unless you use a thick gel (the electromagnetic field of the clay is stronger than surface charge of the scar tissue).

To contrast, illite can actually cause minor damage to healing tissue.  Thierry's mother would use Illite against a Buruli ulcer (infection), until the infection was gone.  When new granulating tissue would start to form, illite would actually start to cause bleeding.  They would then shift to using a montmorillonite clay to finish the healing.  One of the individuals I was corresponding with in Australia noted that the use of illite caused an increase in wound pain (buruli).  She would follow with a bentonite/montmorillonite poultice to sooth the area and eliminate the discomfort.

Zeolite is what I call a "water hating" colloid.  As such, the "water loving" swelling clays, like our green desert clay, or like other calcium/sodium bentonites, do a much better job at binding acidic waste (they are extremely alkaline) and making an actual change to the bio-terrain of the digestive tract.  They are REALLY good at removing heavy metals from bile, and preventing retention toxicity.  Illite is probably a bit better at breaking down biofilm.

Zeolite, being "roundish", will simply bounce off of substances that it cannot sorpt.  It will not likely adhere to anything, unlike smectite.  This has advantages and disadvantages.

Of course, as you know, zeolite itself is rock.  However, the micronized version of zeolite has an abundance particles small enough to enter the blood stream.

Traditional-use clays tend to work on detoxing the liver (but don't do much directly for kidneys)... due to the large particle size.

The smallest micronized zeolite particles seem to do a better job of detoxing the kidneys.  One clay user, who had been using clay for many, many years, found herself in stage 3 kidney failure.

We started including micronized zeolite, and she got a very severe healing reaction.  She adjusted to micronized zeolite use pretty easily, and after two years of regular use, completely restored kidney function.

All of these different particles have great-- and often unique-- uses. They are all a bit different even though they share the same general properties.

How does clay act as a catalyst?

The assumption is that it up-regulates genes responsible for Phase 1 detoxification.  That's the only method of action I can point to.

I assume this might happen when blood levels of a particular toxin decrease (as clay removes the stuff in bile), and as organ function improves.

This "strange" effect is so powerful that I've known toxic people that could only start with putting clay on the roof of the mouth (clay gel).  That is the only way they could tolerate "internal" use.

I'm assuming that the smallest zeolite particles in fully micronized zeolite do cross the blood brain barrier.  However, I was much more "enthused" about this when we had access to fully micronized zeolite, where we were looking at an abundance of particles sized 0.1 - 0.5, and 0.5 - 1.0 microns.

Bentonite and heavy metal cleansing:  Clinical research was done by a doctor in Japan using bentonite clay and cilantro.  It was demonstrated that the combination of the two safely removed heavy metals like mercury from the brain.  The clinical results were conclusive.

However, their time table might be wrong.  I believe the study was for about 3 weeks.  The researchers didn't have equipment like Dr. Chistopher Shade has to measure serum levels accurately.  So, I tend to do 3-4 weeks as a critical time frame for heavy metal detox, but think it can be 3-6 months before the body is really done purging them.

I still have a mouth full of mercury.  That was the first heavy metal cleanse I ever did. :)

Every so often, I do heavy metal challenge testing (DMSA), and my mercury (and other) levels are exceptionally low.  I also do tissue sensitivity testing (Elisa I believe) to make sure my immune system is non-metal reactive.  Sometimes this can be more important than the amount of heavy metals.  Some people are very tolerant, and some are extremely sensitive.

I hypothesize, based only on observations, that clay use calms the immune system.  I've seen this via oral use, and also clay baths.

I now use cilantro and garlic regularly for their ability to up-regulate detox and chelate mercury.  Dr. Shade also uses Haritaki; he claims that this plant has the most polyphenols which up-regulate detox.  I make tinctures, but only use them every so often, maybe a 1 ounce dropper bottle per year.

The bentonite/cilantro cleanse took care of my brain fog many years ago, and it did it quickly!  I was amazed!  I am assuming that the zeolite would do a good job too, it just might bind the metals more in the blood than the bile.  That's speculation only, based on the reports that people get good results using the zeolite, and the "Clay Disciples" have gotten great results using clay.

Some people can't tolerate cilantro, it causes too much of a metals dump into the blood stream... which is why I recommend people first do a digestive system cleanse (and hopefully get their eating habits on the right track), before trying anything that might put too much strain on the liver/kidneys.  At least two months.

I try to convince them to rehydrate the body during that phase, so if they do more cleansing, they are already used to drinking enough water.

We are close to some of the purest zeolite on the planet.  I looked into micronizing it myself, but it was just too expensive.  I thought I might be able to fully micronized zeolite and then sell it not labeled for human use (and thus outside of the jurisdiction of the FDA).

I always rely upon a holistic approach to heavy metal cleansing to ensure best possible results.  I also try to get people to use a sauna, or at least hot and cold showers!  I never rely upon one substance for anything.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 08:38:07 PM by Jason »
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Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
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 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2019, 07:38:49 PM »
Was the cilantro made into a tincture and taken with clay water?
Thanks!


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2019, 08:56:45 PM »
...no.  If I remember correctly, raw chopped cilantro was used (about 1/4 cup per day).

Dr. Klinghardt, though, uses a tincture.  A tincture of both the leaves and the seeds would be ideal, if possible.

I myself simply throw chopped cilantro into a lunch soup.

If brain fog is caused by mercury toxicity, and if a person is not in retention toxicity (and thus cannot tolerate the cilantro at all), the brain fog goes really quickly, usually within three days or so.

Of course, I myself always use the "trifecta", garlic, cilantro and cayenne.  ;)

That said, individuals who are seriously toxic should apply much more caution for three to four weeks or so.
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Jason R. Eaton
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Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2019, 11:15:04 PM »
Are any of the clay nano sizes?


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2019, 10:36:59 AM »
Hi -

The reason that clays are so fascinating is because of the complex characteristics which come with clay's crystalline properties.

In the "nano" world, clay particles are HUGE.  When you break them down, they become something other than clay.  All of the properties that make clay useful disappear, and you have something else in their place.

The smaller a particle becomes, the more dangerous it becomes, and you then have to really know the exact size, shape, and charge of the particle to understand how it is going to work in the body.

I'm not aware of anything out there that could be considered "clay" that has smaller particles than micronized zeolite, say around 0.1 microns in diameter.  That is 100 nanometers.  And even these tiny micronized zeolite particles lose some of the valuable properties that, say, micronized particles at 10 microns possess.

There may be something else out there that I'm not aware of.  It took me a long time to "get on board" with the use of crushed rock (micronized zeolite) as compared with traditional use therapeutic clays!

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Jason R. Eaton
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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2019, 06:27:19 PM »
www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-you-stop-flesh-eating-bacteria-apply-clay/
I think 200 nanometers is smaller than 100, right?

This clay was unique in that they were very small particle size, 200 nanometers," or one four hundredth  of human hair, Williams says. Their suppliers—French companies Agriletz and Agricur—could not say where the clays came from,[/size][/size]


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2019, 08:47:07 PM »
We can't even confirm exactly what these minerals were.  Without doing X-Ray diffraction, they could have been anything.  This particular work could NEVER be duplicated, because the original supplier did not have any more of the raw material, and refused to even say where they mined it from.

Not the best science, in my book, as least as far as identifying and studying the source materail.

200 nanometers is larger than 100 nanometers.

The clay that was ACTUALLY used in Africa for Buruli was sized at about 20 microns in diameter.

You should read this article very carefully, as it challenges the central idea of "killer clays":

http://www.eytonsearth.org/buruli-ulcer.php

We also have a complete copy of the entire ASU study done in the science section at Eytons' Earth.

Here is a typical definition of what a clay particle is:

"Grain size is classified as clay if the particle diameter is <0.002 mm, as silt if it is between 0.002 mm and 0.06 mm, or as sand if it is between 0.06 mm and 2 mm. Soil texture refers to the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay particle sizes, irrespective of chemical or mineralogical composition."

The smallest is about 2000 nanometers, here... about 2 microns.

We might state that fully micronized zeolite can "defy" this definition, if the (mainly European) studies on fully micronized zeolite are correct as far as classifying particle size characteristics!

Clay minerology is quite complex.  I suppose we could change the definition of what makes clay, clay... but we've personally done testing on all of the popular clays used in natural medicine.

Clay is special because it selectively interacts with the environment.  This is likely due to its crystalline nature.  Once you break the particle down to the point where it does not have crystalline properties, that's when I believe it is no longer clay.

You should know that very few companies selling or mining clay get it right (accurate classification).  Sometimes, they even sell clay as one type, and it turns out to be another type altogether.

Terramin also makes the claim of super secret small minerals, but we had it tested (we love the clay by the way, we're just talking scientific accuracy here) by one of the nations experts on clay mineralogy, and we were able to classify it properly.

Now, you might have particles made up of SiO2 (for example), and this is a very small particle, and you might accidently THINK that it is clay; and it may even be in the clay... it may have even been clay at one time, but now it's simply a weathered fragment of smectite (as an example).
« Last Edit: April 25, 2019, 11:47:29 AM by Jason »
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Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u


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Re: Smectite, Illite, Zeolite - Conversation on Particle Characteristics
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2019, 04:42:33 PM »
...I sent an email to an associate to get his opinion on particle sizing as it pertains to clay.

He had a surprising yet interesting perspective:

"It is the thickness that generally relates best to the clay’s surface area, and therefore to its reactivity. The thinnest clay mineral crystal is probably smectite, which is composed of 0.9 nm-thick sheets, which are just one unit cell thick. When they form stacks of crystals, with swelling at their interfaces, the stacks of particles are of course much thicker. I don’t know much about a-b plane clay sizes."

I tend to look at particle sizing from the perspective of bio-availability/activity, but his perspective is certainly something to consider!
------------
Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u