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Topic: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet  (Read 317 times)

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Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« on: March 01, 2019, 12:56:53 PM »
Nobody thinks about splinters.  That is, until you get one.  Then, it can be all you think about.  It's amazing that something so tiny can be such a loud nuisance!

Usually, a gentle touch with quality tweezers gets the job done with only a quick touch of momentary agony caused by screaming nerves.

However, sometimes it can feel like you are digging through your flesh with a backhoe, and yet still can't grab it.

This is where clay comes in.  In reality, clay really should be the first choice, but it usually isn't.  Usually, you have to torture yourself for awhile before resorting to the painless option.  Why?  Because it is a bit sloppy, inconvenient, and takes a few hours.

Upward facing splinters usually exit with a few hours, while splinters that are fully buried in the skin sideways can take two treatments.

The treatments are rather easy.  Plop some clay (make sure it is therapeutic clay, your backyard clay deposit may not be the best choice!) on the site, mold to cover the entire area, apply a dressing (could even be a paper towel or tissue), tape it up and let it be to do its job.

Splinters might not be that interesting to discuss, but the mechanics at work are.  Therapeutic clay works WITH the body, rather than on the body.

The skin-- and any underlying tissue affected-- actually starts to open up, like a vortex, to eject the foreign mass.  If the cells of the body do not respond for whatever reason, then clay only has a very slight action.

With splinters, however, clay always works.

I noticed this phenomenon when I was "forced" to help treat a skin graft donor site. I big one.  With hundreds of staples holding the skin together.  I honestly think we would have got better -- gentler -- service at a hardware store.  You know, "Ace is the place with the HELPFUL hardware..."

After watching this person get tortured for days... with sorry excuses for "nursing staff" wielding pliers and a wealth of disinterest, trying to dig out staples (using dynamite would probably have been gentler then their methods), I finally simply fired them.

Usually I am not insistent.  I'm a big believer in freedom of choice, even in the freedom to choose suffering and folly.  But this time, I just couldn't help myself.

I taught the individual to apply clay to the entire area about 3/4 inch thick.  Let it rest for a few hours, then carefully remove the clay.

From the very first application I was amazed.  The newly granulating tissue simply opened up.  The "patient" simply had to pluck the staples out, painlessly, even effortlessly.  Plus, the clay application removed all pain and irritation.

In a few short days, all of the staples were gone.

The barbaric "corregated cardboard" skin graft donor sites (on both legs) healed amazingly fast and with very little irritation.

This taught me--reminded me-- how much the human body actually LOVES clay applications in so many different circumstances.

Also, if you are new clay:  Beware!  ..but no need to be weary.  I used to make clay gel by mixing clay by hand.  And I made a lot of clay gel.  I was amazed at things that came out of my hand.  I didn't KNOW where any of it came from... tiny pieces of glass, tiny shards of metal, who knows.  Probably all from childhood.

I would simply notice things sticking out of my hand, and then would simply pluck them out... again, painlessly and almost effortlessly.

Who would have thought:  Clay.

 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2019, 01:04:52 PM by Jason »
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Jason R. Eaton
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Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2019, 01:44:21 PM »
Oh, I almost forgot...  This 'action' is not just limited to things like splinters.

One time, I ripped the entire bottom off of my right foot.  I was actually trying to help someone jump start their car.  I had dress shoes on, so I stupidly took them off to push start the car.

Everything was going great!  ...until he popped the clutch and then floored the gas petal.  My right foot was planted firmly, and was dragged about an inch, which was about an inch too much to be dragged.

I lost all of the skin on the sole of the foot, and so much asphalt was embedded in the foot that it was soot-black everywhere that it wasn't blood red (from blood).  It was not a pretty site.

I left the office for the day (my co-workers didn't mind as I was leaving unsightly bloody foot prints everywhere), after picking as much debris out of the foot as I could, and wrapping the foot with paper towels (it's all I had access to).

Luckily, I had clay.  Within six hours the bottom of the foot was pristine.  The clay pulled out all of the debris.

I continued to use clay, and only lost one full day of work.  Soon, I was able to dress the foot, wrap it with cloth, and then with plastic, and then put it in a loosely tied shoe.

It was not fun, nor pretty.  But it worked better than anything else on the planet would have, and with the added bonus of complete pain relief.

« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 02:40:54 PM by Jason »
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Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u


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Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2019, 01:56:38 PM »
Thank you for the info!


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Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2019, 02:24:27 PM »
So glad to hear this. Once when I was 12, I was making a bed that was pushed up against a panelled wall. A large sliver of wood panelling went underneath my fingernail about 1/2 way to the lunula. It broke off with some remaining as my grandmother tried to remove it. She wrapped my fingertip in a piece of bacon. It was incredibly painful, though it did draw it out over some days. LoL.


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Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2019, 02:42:13 PM »
Ouch, that sounds like one of the worst places possible for a splinter!

How about that, a bacon wrap.  I learn something new every day! LOL
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Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u


Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2019, 03:14:45 PM »
Help welcome as I try to "pull" out a decades-old imbedded splinter from my husband's finger.  In the last month it has swollen up on his knuckle.  No skin opening as it healed over many years ago.  Any advice on utilizing clay to pull the splinter out?


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Re: Splinters: The Most Annoying Things on the Planet
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2019, 06:09:59 PM »
Hi Jane:

If it were my knuckle, I would take a container that the hand fits in, fill it with clay gel, and have the knuckle/hand submerged in the clay gel for the evening.

I would treat it over night as well, by wrapping the entire finger in a dressing after applying the clay thick.

 Because it has been so long, it might take quite awhile to draw it out.
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Change to survive.  Adapt to thrive.
Jason R. Eaton
Author of Upon a Clay Tablet
Founder of Eytons Earth
Current Project:
 Eytons' Earth Foundation: Nutrition & Detox Study Program[/u